Posts

Mt. Whitney’s Actual Elevation – 14,505 feet.

Originally when I created my Mt. Whitney images, I did a Google search for the elevation.  The source I found had it listed at 14,497 or 4418 meters.  Apparently it was incorrect. That might have been the original assessment when it was measured in the 1800s.

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New Giclée Prints from Steve Forney

 

I’m happy to announce that eleven of my previous images are now available as giclée prints.  Six are from the popular WPA-style National Parks series. They are all printed on sturdy archival quality Hewlett Packard paper.  These images are intended to be framed and will add color and elegance to any setting, and they are perfect for either the office or home.  All images are sold as signed prints. Please click the image to be taken to its order form on the poster store.

forney_whiteyDay_giclee

Mt. Whitney, Daytime

Artwork –  17″ x 22 ” ( 43.2 cm x 55.9 cm)  Trim – 18″ x 23″ (45.7 cm X 58.4 cm)



forney_whitneyNight_giclee

Mt. Whitney, Nighttime

Artwork –  17″ x 22 ” ( 43.2 cm x 55.9 cm)  Trim – 18″ x 23″ (45.7 cm X 58.4 cm)

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swiss flag in alps

Steve Forney’s Switzerland Giclée Now Available

Swiss alps poster with a huge Swiss flag

After numerous requests, I finally had “See the Alps, Switzerland” printed as a poster.  This isn’t a cheap offset print, but rather a high quality giclée print using archival quality inks.  The scene depicts a Swiss flag in the breeze above the Aletsch Glacier at the Jungfrau Read more

Mt. Whitney

 

Mt. Whitney night and day

Standing at 14,497 feet, Mt. Whitney is the highest peak in the lower 48 states. It was named after Josiah Whitney, the California State Geologist in 1864. If you’re up for a challenge then go for the 22 mile (35 km.) round-trip hike to the summit starting at Whitney Portal. It’s on my to do list.

These images are inspired by the great WPA National Parks posters of the 1930s. Both were created in Adobe Illustrator using a minimal palette of flat color, similar to the traditional silkscreen process.   At first I created the daylight version but then thought that a nighttime full moon version might work.  Speaking as one who started his illustration career using an airbrush prior to the digital revolution, it was nice to be able to clone the original work and adjust the colors instead of creating a whole new separate piece of art.

Both Mt. Whitney night and day images are available at Steve Forney’s poster store